Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School

Contact Us

Sociology

The study of sociology aims to provide students with an understanding of the social world in which we live.  We examine how society is organised and the key factors influencing individuals and groups within that society.  Key questions will include:

  • Who benefits from our current organisation of society?
  • Who is disadvantaged as a result?
  • How do we interact within our society?
  • How do class, gender and ethnicity influence our place and role in society?

GCSE

Subject:

Sociology

Contact Teacher(s):

Miss Jeffers

Lessons per Week:

2 per week

Examination Board:

AQA

 

Specification no.:

AQA 8192

https://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/sociology/gcse/sociology-8192/introduction

Qualification:

GCSE

Course Content

Paper 1 (50%)

·         The sociology of families and education with theory and methodology

Paper 2 (50%)

  • The sociology of crime and deviance and social stratification with theory and methodology 

Student Grouping

  • Mixed Ability

Monitoring Process

  • Pupils will have one written homework per week
  • All pupils have to find and bring to the lesson one news article per week for discussion

Coursework Titles

  • N/A

Key assessment and dates

Pupils will be assessed on each area by terminal exam at the end of the Fifth Form.  We will cover the two papers as follows:

  • Third Form – the sociological approach, social structures, processes and issues, the sociology of families
  • Fourth Form – the sociology of families and education, social stratification systems
  • Fifth Form – crime and deviance, revision of third form material 

Homework 

  • One per week
  • Students must also read one newspaper per week as a minimum 

Textbook/Materials/Visits

 ·         AQA GCSE 9-1 Sociology Student Book, Wilson, Kidd and Addison (Collins)

·         AQA GCSE 9-1 Sociology Student Book, Owens and Woodfield (Hodder)

·         AQA GCSE Sociology Revision Book (Collins)

·         Newspapers, BBC news app & website 

How Parents can help

  • Look at marks, points for improvement, comments from previous homeworks and discuss these with your son and encourage him to improve
  • Please encourage your son to read around the subject and to keep up to date with current affairs
  • Visit the AQA website to look at past papers and mark schemes.

Possible jobs, careers and courses

GCSE Sociology helps students to gain knowledge and understanding of key social structures, processes and issues. Students will develop their analytical, assimilation and communication skills by comparing and contrasting perspectives on a variety of social issues, constructing reasoned arguments, making substantiated judgements and drawing reasoned conclusions.

By studying sociology, students will develop transferable skills including how to:

  • investigate facts and make deductions
  • develop opinions and new ideas on social issues
  • analyse and better understand the social world 

Those who continue with sociology to a higher level often gravitate towards careers helping others.  This includes the police force, social workers, probation officers and charities.  Sociology graduates also are found working in the legal sector, journalism and human resources 

 

 

A-Level Sociology (AQA)

 

The study of sociology aims to provide students with an understanding of the social world in which we live.  We examine how society is organised and the key factors influencing individuals and groups within that society. 

Paper 1: Education with Theory and Methods

Examination:  2 hours (33.3%)

  • the role and functions of the education system
  • differential educational achievement of social groups
  • relationships and processes within schools
  • the significance of educational policies, including policies of selection, marketisation and privatisation

Paper 2:  Topics in Sociology

Examination:      2 hrs                      (33.3%)

Research Methods

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research
  • sources of data
  • the distinction between primary and secondary data
  • the relationship between positivism and interpretivism
  • sociological methods; the nature of ‘social facts’
  • theoretical, practical and ethical considerations

Families and Households

  • the relationship of the family to the social structure,
  • social change and state policies
  • changing patterns of marriage, cohabitation, separation, divorce, childbearing and the life course
  • gender roles, domestic labour and power relationships within the family in contemporary society
  • the nature of childhood, and changes in the status of children in the family and society
  • demographic trends in the United Kingdom since 1900 

Beliefs in Society

  • ideology, science and religion,
  • the relationship between social change and social stability
  • religious organisations, including cults, sects, denominations, churches and New Age movements
  • the relationship between different social groups and religious/spiritual organisations and movements
  • the significance of religion and religiosity in the contemporary world, including the nature and extent of secularisation

 

Paper 3:  Crime and Deviance with Theory and Methods

Examination:  2 hrs                          (33.3%)

Crime and Deviance

  • crime, deviance, social order and social control
  • the social distribution of crime and deviance
  • globalisation and crime in contemporary society
  • crime control, surveillance, prevention and punishment 

Theory and Methods

  • quantitative and qualitative methods of research
  • sources of data
  • the relationship between positivism, interpretivism and sociological methods
  • the theoretical, practical and ethical considerations influencing choice of topic, choice of method(s) and the conduct of research
  • consensus, conflict, structural and social action theories
  • the concepts of modernity and post-modernity in relation to sociological theory
  • the nature of science and the extent to which Sociology can be regarded as scientific
  • the relationship between theory and methods
  • debates about subjectivity, objectivity and value freedom
  • the relationship between Sociology and social policy