Cardinal Vaughan Memorial School

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History & Politics

Key Stage 3

Course Content

  • First Form: The Roman Empire, Medieval Realms (1000-1500), Britain 1500-1750
  • Second Form: Britain 1750-1900, World War 1, World War II, the Holocaust

GCSE

Examination Board:

EDEXCEL

 

Specification no.:

Edexcel GCSE (9–1) History

http://qualifications.pearson.com/content/dam/pdf/GCSE/History/2016/specification-and-sample-assessments/9781446925867_GCSE2016_L12_History_Web.pdf

Qualification:

GCSE

Course Content

Paper 1 (30%)

·         Crime and punishment in Britain, c1000–present and Whitechapel, c1870–c1900: crime, policing and the inner city

Paper 2 (40%)

  • Early Elizabethan England, 1558–88
  • Superpower relations and the Cold War, 1941–91

Paper 3 (30%)

  • Weimar and Nazi Germany, 1918–39

Pupils will be assessed on each area by terminal exam at the end of the Fifth Form.  We cover the three papers as follows:

  • Third Form – Source skills: The Russian Revolution, America between the wars, Weimar Germany.
  • Fourth Form – Nazi Germany, Superpower relations and the Cold War
  • Fifth Form – Crime and Punishment, Elizabethan England

Possible jobs, careers and courses

An A level and degree in history develops your critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively. It will develop your ability to construct an argument and communicate findings in a clear and persuasive manner, both orally and in writing. It gives you the confidence to discuss ideas in groups, and to negotiate, question and summarise and to appreciate the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

Some history graduates go on to do further study at Masters level in order to specialise in an area of history and cultures of interest to them.  However, many postgraduate courses accept graduates from any subject and this allows history graduates to choose subjects as diverse as accountancy, journalism, law, museum studies, and teaching.

Sixth Form History (OCR)

History in the Sixth Form will enable you to acquire and communicate knowledge and understanding of selected periods of History, develop your understanding of historical terms and concepts, of how the past has been interpreted and of the nature of historical study, explore the significance of events and individuals in society, understand the nature of historical evidence and methods used by historians in analysis and evaluation and, perhaps most importantly, develop your enthusiasm and interest in History.

The course is divided into four modules. Three are assessed by exam papers and one by a piece of coursework, which will be done in the Upper Sixth. Units 1 and 2 will make up the AS qualification and will be sat at the end of the Lower Sixth. Those pupils opting for A Level History will sit all exam and coursework units at the end of the Upper Sixth.

Pupils are expected to use the Library and to read widely around the subject.

The two groups will study the topics below:

 

Group A

Group B

Unit 1

Russia and its Rulers 1894-1941

The Causes of the French Revolution and Napoleon 1774-1815

Unit 2

Britain, 1930-1997

Britain, 1930-1997

Unit 3

The Changing Nature of Warfare 1792-1945

Civil Rights in the USA, 1865-1992

Unit 4

Coursework

Coursework

An A level and degree in history develops your critical reasoning and analytical skills, including the capacity for solving problems and thinking creatively. It will develop your ability to construct an argument and communicate findings in a clear and persuasive manner, both orally and in writing. It gives you the confidence to discuss ideas in groups, and to negotiate, question and summarise and to appreciate the different factors that influence the activities of groups and individuals in society.

Some history graduates go on to do further study at Masters level in order to specialise in an area of history and cultures of interest to them.  However, many postgraduate courses accept graduates from any subject and this allows history graduates to choose subjects as diverse as:

  • Accountancy
  • Journalism
  • Law
  • Museum studies
  • Librarianship
  • Advertising, Marketing & PR
  • Banking, Finance & Accountancy
  • Charity, Not-for-profit & NGO
  • Culture, Music & Performing Arts
  • Environment, Agriculture & Conservation
  • Management Consulting & Business
  • Media
  • Public Sector & Defence
  • Recruitment & Human Resources
  • Teaching & Education

Sixth Form Government & Politics (Edexcel)

The course is designed to develop an informed understanding of contemporary political structures and issues within the UK and USA.  Pupils will also develop a critical awareness of the changing relationship between political ideas, institutions and processes to promote a sense of the rights and responsibilities of the individual within society. No previous knowledge of Government and Politics is required, though an interest in current affairs is essential, as is the reading a quality daily newspaper, such as The Times, The Daily Telegraph or The Guardian.

AS LEVEL

Unit 1 UK Politics (1 hour 30 minutes, 50% of the total mark)

Democracy and participation, political parties, electoral systems, voting behaviour and the media

Unit 2 UK Government (1 hour 30 minutes, 50% of the total mark):   

The UK constitution, Parliament, Prime Minister and Executive, the relationship between the branches

A LEVEL

Unit 1 UK Politics (2 hours, 33.3% of the total mark)

Political participation, core political ideas – conservatism, socialism, liberalism

Unit 2 UK Government (2 hours, 33.3% of the total mark):  

The UK government, optional political ideas – one from anarchism, feminism, nationalism, multiculturalism

Unit 3 Comparative Politics (2 hours, 33.3% of the total mark):  

The USA – constitution and federalism, Congress, the presidency, Supreme Court, democracy and participation, civil rights

The course is entirely assessed by exams, there is no coursework.       

The kind of skills you will have developed include:

  • gathering information, assessing and interpreting it
  • developing opinions and ideas
  • essay writing, presentation and analytical skills
  • reading pages of text and picking out the essential points
  • stating a case
  • solving problems
  • assimilating facts

Potential career paths could include:

Banking, journalism, chartered accountant, technical writer, industrial buyer, retail buyer, marketing executive, solicitor, police force, charity work, social worker, business administration, insurance.